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The unfortunate truth is that working moms often miss seeing much of their younger children's development (first steps, first words, new discoveries, etc.) Homeschooling, especially as children get older, allows moms more time to interact and get to know their children better. Many working moms are tired from their workday, and the few concentrated hours in the evenings, when energy and emotional levels are low, are not ideal times for interaction.  J. Michael Smith, President HSLDA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do You Have Babies or Preschoolers?  Homeschool Them!

By Denise Kanter

The birth of a child as we all know is something beautiful and wonderful.  It also can bring overwhelming feelings of just how we are to care for this child.  We know that this precious bundle is a gift from God, as stated in Scripture.  We know that his child belongs to God, and that we are to raise this child in the admonition of the Lord.  We watch as the child grows tremendously in the first year, we help them learn during this time to eat solid foods, drink from a cup, crawl, and maybe even walk.  All in one year!  The second year brings a whole new adventure and a beginning of disciplining, training, curiosity that gets this energy filled child into just about everything, and beginning parental thoughts of how to educate this child.  It is amazing, but parents tend to begin thinking of how to educate their children very early in their child’s life.  This is wonderful, because it is important to God that we educate our children.  He wants them to be wise. 

“From infancy you have known the Holy Scriptures and they have made you wise unto salvation in Christ Jesus.” 2 Timothy 3:15    

How then should we educate our child at this young age and beyond?  God is very clear that He gave the responsibility to parents to educate His children with the Bible as the foundation to all learning.  So is it wise for a parent to delegate these duties to another?  We know that Scripture states that we (children included) are not to sit in the counsel of the wicked.  God said we shall not be a companion of fools. The latter eliminates just about every institutional form of education from daycares/preschools to universities. 

It is no surprise to anyone that public schools are a disaster academically, but more importantly spiritually.  They deny the existence of Jesus Christ. Without a primary miracle, it is almost impossible for a child to overcome the 12,000 hours of secular instruction they will receive from 1st to 12th grade.  Day in and day out, ungodly peers, ungodly instructors, and ungodly curriculum is imprinting on the minds of these impressionable, untrained, and unwise children that there is no God.    While we are thankful that Jesus still performs miracles today, there is no place in Scripture that states we can throw our children in spiritual harms way, and wait for a miracle.  In fact, if we do this, are we not tempting Jesus?  As Christian parents, we are instructed not to ‘hinder our children from coming to Him’.   

What about daycares and preschools? Are they not preparing a child for a love for life long learning?  No! When looking closely at the studies and research used by mandatory preschool advocates and other preschool programs, their claims are absolutely wrong and untruthful.   

The research does in fact have overwhelming evidence that shows children in daycares and preschools are more apt to be1:

  • sick, 2
  • stressed, 3
  • passively withdrawn,4
  • aggressive, defiant and disobedient 5

These are hardly behaviors that lead to a love for life long learning.  I am not one to promote labels, and in fact I think that they are destroying a generation of children.   But when children are surrounded daily by foolish and ungodly peers, we cannot be surprised when then exhibit extremely unacceptable behavior.  This behavior many so often conclude is some type of brain damage your child has (correctible by psychotic brain damaging drugs) and not a result of the preschool environment.   And sad as this is, we are seeing Christian families having their children as young as 2 diagnosed with some behavior and drugged.

What children need beginning in infancy is: consistent Godly leadership and instruction by their parents who care more about them than anyone (on this earth). 

What children need is: to grow in the love of Jesus Christ through solid Biblical home instruction, away from those that will lead (either by omission or commission) your child away from the Lord.

To sum up what daycares and preschools mostly likely provide is this:

"An increasing number of children suffer a 'character disturbance', emotional detachment and uncontrollable inner rage, and its origins can be traced to disruptions in parent-infant bonding." 6  

These origins are traced to institutionalizing young children in daycares and preschools. If your child is in preschool, take them out and homeschool them before it leads to life long problems. 

  1. http://www.cwfa.org/articledisplay.asp?id=7054&department=BLI&categoryid=commentary Concerned Women for America, The Symptoms of Parent Withdrawal 12/17/2004 By Rachel Mahaffey
  2. Bell, David M., Gleiber, Dennis W., Mercer, Alice Atkins, "Illness associated with child day care: a study of incidence and cost," American Journal of Public Health, v. 79 (April 1989), p. 479-84.
  3. cbsnews.com "The Negative Effects of Childcare?" July 17, 2003, as found at http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/07/16/earlyshow/living/parenting/printable563639.shtml.
  4. Robertson, Brian; There is No Place Like Work (Dallas, Texas: Spence Publishing Company, 2000) p. 26.
  5. Kathryn Hooks, "'Hands-On' Love," Concerned Women for America, 8 July 2003, as found at www.beverlylahayeinstitute.org.
  6. Mack, Dana; The Assault on Parenthood (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1997), p. 182.